Cincinnati/Northern KY International Airport (CNKIA)

CNKIA is one of only a handful of airports that can offer three simultaneous landings in the world. Integrated Engineering has provided topographic surveys for the resurfacing of Runway 9-27, which is approximately 7,500 feet in length and includes portions of Taxiway K & M. Integrated has also provided topographic surveys of the Employee Bus Maintenance Facility, provided services directly for CNKIA, and also teamed with URS Corporation for additional surveying and design services.

Cincinnati/Northern KY International Airport DHL Topo Survey

Integrated Engineering, PLLC provided the topographic survey for the new expansion project at DHL at the CNKIA. The project included survey of the south end of the existing DHL facility in preparation of approximately 20 acres of paving additions, and roadway renovations. The survey limits included approximately 90 acres of topo of surface features and utilities.

Additionally, our firm provided interim survey data for earthwork stockpiles and verification of grades in fill areas for quantities.

The project is currently under construction.

Wolfe County Public Library Outdoor Classroom

A new outdoor classroom at the Wolfe County Public Library was dedicated as the, "Richard and Carol Jean Jett Gardens", in a ceremony on July 19, 2014. The project was designed by Integrated Engineering. The project includes an outdoor shade structure for the summer children's program at the library, a life-size chess board and pieces, 4 new bronze children's sculptures, benches, a new entry sign and landscaping throughout the property. The library is working on new programs that incorporate their new outdoor classroom. The first of which is a contest to let the children involved in the summer program name the new sculptures and the chess board will be used by the chess club from the local schools.

Campton Streetscape Landscape Revitalization Project

The winter of 2013-2014 killed 80% of the downtown streetscape vegetation that was planted as a part of the original streetscape design in 2012. Integrated Engineering worked on the design of the replacement plant material and reworked the original landscape design in a few areas of the downtown to incorporate more color into the landscape.

Habitat for Humanity Class B Stormwater Infrastructure Grant Project Phase 1 and 2

The Lexington Habitat for Humanity Headquarters on Loudon Avenue applied for and received one of the Class B Stormwater Infrastructure Incentive Grants through LFUCG to renovate their existing site through a series of phased construction projects with an overall end goal of creating a net zero site. The grant will assist in funding phase 1 of the project and HFH will raise additional funds to complete future phases to become the first net zero campus for the organization. Upon completion they would like to use the site as an educational tool to teach others about net zero campuses through tours.

In Phase 1 they will remove the existing impervious parking lot and walkways on the site and replace them with permeable pavers and an underground ADS stormwater storage structure. Stormwater on site will be captured through the pavers and piped to an underground storage tank that will filter suspended solids and slowly release stormwater offsite.

The second phase will incorporate a series of large rain gardens that will treat stormwater entering the site from adjacent properties through the natural processes of rain garden filtration and then be treated a second time as it makes it way to the ADS structure under the parking lot.

Chilesburg Road Development

For this private development job the owner wanted a rendering of what the new entrance might look like with a few different options so that they could choose which one they liked the best. Integrated Engineering took an existing photo of the entrance and added a water feature and new stone bridge.

Town Branch Trail

Cardinal Lane Stormwater Study, Lexington, Kentucky

Integrated Engineering is currently assisting Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government analyzing a 280 acre watershed to investigate existing infrastructure condition, capacity, and behavior of the system. A continuous hydraulic simulation utilizing SWMM modeling was created and analyzed according to LFUCG’s current hydrologic data requirements. A Technical Memorandum report is being created with multiple design alternatives and associated cost estimates. The project also involves interaction with area property owners with completion of LFUCG’s Resident Questionnaire.

Lyndale Drive / Edgewood Road Stormwater Study, Edgewood, Kentucky

Integrated Engineering is currently assisting the Northern Kentucky Sanitation District No. 1 in analyzing a 208 acre watershed to investigate existing infrastructure condition, capacity, and behavior of the system. A continuous hydraulic simulation utilizing SWMM modeling was created and analyzed according to SD1’s current hydrologic data requirements. A Technical Memorandum report is being created with multiple design alternatives and associated cost estimates. The project also involves interaction with area property owners with completion of a Resident Questionnaire.

Water Street Storm & Sanitary Improvements, Richmond Kentucky

The Water Street Storm Sewer is in the heart of Richmond, KY. This system is approximately 2900ft long. The Sewer begins at the intersection of University Drive and Summit Street. The Storm Sewer then traverses underneath several streets, buildings, parking lots and eventually drains into a ditch located on E. Irvine Street between N. Collins Street and N. Madison Avenue. The total drainage area to the outfall is approximately 240Ac.


Parts of this sanitary sewer were constructed several decades ago with portions possibly being over a century old. The existing system is dilapidated over the years. The existing sanitary sewer is an 18” Clay line and the city experiences severe sanitary sewer overflow due to infiltration of water into the system. This sewer shed is approximately 240acres with an approximate population of 8,000 people.


There are several building /structures that were constructed above the Sanitary Sewer. Inevitable growth through the decades has increased the sewer flow into the system. The service life of the materials used in the construction has been expended and said materials are rapidly deteriorating. Lack of smooth transitions between the various pipe sections, has encumbered the efficiency and the capacity of the system. The above-described factors have combined to render the existing system inadequate causing sanitary sewer overflows during storm events throughout Water Street. A 24” ductile iron trunk sewer is proposed for the water shed. Design includes construction plans for the new system, by pass pumping plan during construction. The approximate fee for sewer construction is $1 million.

I-75 Terraced Reforestation Project, Covington, KY

This purpose of this unique project was to mitigate storm water runoff in the project area, which consists of approximately eight acres of hillside adjacent to Interstate 75 in Covington, Kentucky. The project was funded by the State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan program, administered by the Kentucky Division of Water. The Grantee was the Sanitation District No. 1.

The project is located in the watershed of the Willow Run Sewer, a large diameter (96 inches and larger) combined sewer, which experiences wet weather overflows (CSOS). The intent of the project was to reduce the quantity of the overflows and to improve the quality of the storm water runoff in the Willow Run Sewer. The methodology was to intercept the local runoff with a series of terraced vegetated berms, which were designed to infiltrate a portion of the runoff, allowing for transpiration of the water by plants and filtering of the portion of runoff that the plants do not uptake.

As the prime consultant to the District we coordinated the work of a team of Civil Designers, Landscape Architects, Soils Scientists, and Geotechnical Engineers. In addition to coordination of the work of the sub-consultants, the Engineer’s other responsibilities included: (1) Assembly of plans, technical specifications, and bid documents, including the SRF bid conditions; (2) Coordination and documentation of project review meetings; (3) Assistance in securing regulatory permits, including preparation of the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan; (4) Review of shop drawings submittals by the contractor; (5) Review and approval of periodic Pay Requests by the contractor; (6) Review and processing of Construction Change Orders; (7) Providing supporting documentation to the District for periodic SRF reports; and (8) Construction staking and As-built surveys.

The District has made provision for pre-and-post-construction sampling of the storm water runoff from the project to evaluate the efficacy of the berms.

Regional Detention Basin Sharkey Property

Integrated Engineering, PLLC was hired by Anderson Communities to value engineer the regional Detention Basin 2 at Sharkey Property. This is a regional basin located on the Sharkey Property off of Leestown Road. The basin is located behind Hatter Lane & Towne Square Park. The existing basin did not meet the water quality requirements with LFUCG and the capacity was less than required. The existing basin needed to be redesigned to accommodate the changes for proposed development and water quality criteria.


Integrated Engineering utilized the drainage area maps and reports provided by Anderson Communities to perform the analysis and delineate the contributing area and the impervious area for the watershed. The total drainage area is approximately 100.5Acres. The pre-developed site was compared with post development site based on the land use proposed for the Sharkey Property. HydroCad was used to model the pre and post development conditions.


Based on the LFUCG Storm Water Manual, the required Water Quality Depth would be 1.0” for a 60% impervious area. Based on this depth a WQV of 159,357ft3 was required, the water quality was achieved using a sand filter with a dewatering time of 24hrs.


The detention basin and the riser stricture was designed to control the post development peak flow to that of pre-development peak flows for the following storm events 10YR-6HR, 100YR-6HR, 100YR-24HR, JUNE 18 1992, JUNE 26, 1995. The total storage capacity of the basin is 700,000 cubic feet of storage.

Sustainable Desing Title

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Deep Springs Pump Station

Owner : LFUCG

Integrated Engineering is part of a team, that completed the preliminary redesign of the existing Deep Spring Pump Station for Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government. The existing pump station was constructed in 1963 and is identified as SSO listed in the documentation of LFUCG’s Consent Decree. The existing pump station is classified as a Class “C” pump station with a 4” diameter cast iron force main that is approximately 4,000 lf in length and discharges in to a gravity sewer line along Bryan Station Road.


The Deep Springs Pump Station Upgrade and Force Main Improvement Project will address significant capacity and condition problems for the LFUCG Division of Water Quality. Approximately 370ac form the sewer shed for this pump station. Existing clay lines in the neighborhood has deteriorated over the years, adding significant water to the sewer system during wet weather flow.


The proposed pump station is designed to have sufficient capacity to pump the additional flow and eliminate any sanitary sewer overflows. The existing pump station is located in a 100yr flood plain. Property acquisition is necessary for the construction of the new pump station. The existing site includes various utilities including electric, water, cable, gas, sanitary and storm sewer. The Kentucky Utility power poles may require relocation to accommodate the utility trucks that would need to access the wet wells for maintenance requirements. The force main from the pump station would connect to the North Elkhorn Force Main.

Highland Acres Pump Station Elimination Project

The purpose of this project was to eliminate sanitary sewer overflows (SSOS) at the Highland Acres Pump Station (HAPS) in compliance with the District’s USEPA Consent Decree. Preliminary studies by the District and its planning consultant had determined that the best solution was to construct a gravity sewer from the HAPS to the Kentucky Aire Pump Station, located approximately 1,000 feet to the south. It was also decided that approximately half of the proposed sewer should be constructed by some type of tunneling method since there was a 40-foot high hill between the two pump stations.


The project design started in October 2009 to prepare plans and bid documents for construction of the project. A major requirement for the project was that construction should be substantially complete by the end of 2010 in accordance with the Consent Decree. As part of their project responsibilities, Geotechnical and Environmental sub-consultants were sub-consultants on this project. Their assistance was critical to the evaluation of alternatives and final design of the project. The most challenging aspect of the project was the evaluation of the design alternatives described above. The geologic and topographic conditions of the project area were serious constraints on the available design options. Sewer elevations were fixed at the upper and lower ends of sewer due to tie-in to existing infrastructure; solid rock was at a relatively shallow depth through the middle portion of the project; and it was necessary to cross a stream at about one-third the length of the sewer. All of these factors limited the available range of pipe grades, which impacted the selection of tunneling method and the design of the creek crossing (aerial vs. trenched). It was ultimately decided, after evaluating input from all project participants, that the best solution was to construct the tunnel using a Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) technique with an enhanced guidance system and to construct an aerial crossing of the creek. The aerial crossing allowed an increased pipe slope which met the necessary criteria for the HDD tunneling method. The project was completed on time and within budget and in compliance with environmental regulations and the USEPA Consent Decree.

Lexington Mall Sewer Relocation

Integrated Engineering is currently a sub consultant for the relocation of over 1,500 linear feet of sanitary sewer trunk line associated with the redevelopment of the Lexington Mall property. The project involves upsizing the existing 15” diameter trunk line to 24” to provide additional capacity in this SSO prone area. Particular attention has been given to specifying the correct bypass pump size to handle the wet weather flows for the sanitary sewer trunk line in the event that a wet weather event happens during construction in this sensitive area which is prone to Sanitary Sewer Overflows (SSOs). Other tasks involved the evaluation of the condition of the existing sanitary sewer system within the mall property. Coordination with adjacent commercial property owners has taken place to insure uninterrupted sanitary sewer service during construction. Other coordination has involved the creation of an easement plat and temporary construction easement documents. Project tasks included the preparation of construction documents and specifications necessary for the bidding and construction for the relocation project.

Water Street Storm & Sanitary Improvements, Richmond Kentucky

The Water Street Storm Sewer is in the heart of Richmond, KY. This system is approximately 2900ft long. The Sewer begins at the intersection of University Drive and Summit Street. The Storm Sewer then traverses underneath several streets, buildings, parking lots and eventually drains into a ditch located on E. Irvine Street between N. Collins Street and N. Madison Avenue. The total drainage area to the outfall is approximately 240Ac.


Parts of this sanitary sewer were constructed several decades ago with portions possibly being over a century old. The existing system is dilapidated over the years. The existing sanitary sewer is an 18” Clay line and the city experiences severe sanitary sewer overflow due to infiltration of water into the system. This sewer shed is approximately 240acres with an approximate population of 8,000 people.


There are several building /structures that were constructed above the Sanitary Sewer. Inevitable growth through the decades has increased the sewer flow into the system. The service life of the materials used in the construction has been expended and said materials are rapidly deteriorating. Lack of smooth transitions between the various pipe sections, has encumbered the efficiency and the capacity of the system. The above-described factors have combined to render the existing system inadequate causing sanitary sewer overflows during storm events throughout Water Street. A 24” ductile iron trunk sewer is proposed for the water shed. Design includes construction plans for the new system, by pass pumping plan during construction. The approximate fee for sewer construction is $1 million.

Donnermeyer Drive Covert Run Sewer Replacement, Nothern Kentucky Sanitation District No. 1

This project involved replacement of an existing undersized trunk sewer in an urbanized area. This project addressed several problems, including: (1) the existing 12-inch sewer was undersized and experienced frequent overflows; (2) portions of the existing sewer were located under, or close to, structures; (3) the existing sewer was constraining a proposed upstream roadway and drainage improvement project. It was determined that it was necessary to increase the size of the trunk sewer to 24 inches and to relocate and lower portions of the sewer.


Coordinated was conducted with staff of Sanitation District No. 1 to select a new sewer alignment and profile. The new alignment required construction through school property, impacting existing athletic fields and tennis courts. While the school authorities were cooperative in granting access, a major condition was that sewer construction had to be completed during the Summer season while school was not in session and the athletic fields and tennis courts had to be restored and ready for use when school began in the Fall.


Another major design challenge was that, due to topographic conditions, the sewer had to be located in the pavement of Covert Run Pike, a local arterial street. Within this restricted area, the sewer had to pass under an existing overhead railroad bridge and also a roadway culvert with a stone foundation. There was very limited information on the foundations of both of these structures, introducing concerns about the effects of the construction on stability of the structures. After extensive investigation and probing by the geotechnical consultant and the contractor, it was determined that it would be necessary to install a 48-inch steel casing pipe to accommodate the 24-inch sewer. The casing pipe was installed by jacking with hand excavation of material to minimize disturbance to the existing structures.


The project was ultimately completed satisfying all of the concerns, conditions, and regulations. The completion of the project also allowed the construction of the upstream improvements to proceed, which mitigated a serious local flooding problem.

Duncannon Lane Sanitary Sewer Project, Fox Enterprises Richmond, Kentucky

Integrated Engineering was the prime consultant for the planning and design of over 6,300 linear feet of sanitary sewer trunk line associated with a 253 acre mixed use development in Richmond, Kentucky. The scope of this project included the design of 6,068 linear feet of 10-inch PVC and 283 linear feet of 12-inch ductile iron sanitary sewer that will serve as the trunk line for a 349 acre sewershed. A complete HEC-RAS hydraulic study was also completed to insure that the alignment of the proposed trunk line would be outside the limits of the 100 year flood plain.

Ethan’s Glenn Subdivision WWTP Elimination & Low Pressure Sewer Design

Integrated Engineering has just been given notice to proceed on this surveying and design project. The purpose of this project is to remove the (3) remaining connections to the Ethan’s Glenn Subdivision WWTP so that the plant can be decommissioned. As a result all of the flows will be redirected to another outlet within SD1’s system near Burlington, Kentucky via a low pressure sanitary sewer force main.

Center Court

Owner : South Hill Group

This was a very unique project that was under taken by South Hill Group. This area is in close proximity to University of Kentucky. Majority of the land was covered by old buildings and infrastructure that had deteriorated. The Developer had a vision to revitalize the area. Several buildings, along with a parking garage were planned for the area. This is a mixed used development with commercial and residential condominiums proposed for the site. All the utilities had to be re-routed along Cedar Street, South Upper Street, and Bolivar Street. In order to reroute the infrastructure along the existing roads, maintenance of traffic plans were developed to minimize the impact for vehicles as well as the pedestrians. Integrated Engineering was responsible for grading plans, BMP & SWPPP plan; establishing FFE, quantify unsuitable materials, storm sewer design, sanitary sewer design, detention design, maintenance of traffic, signalization of intersection, ADA requirements, pedestrian access, small retaining wall design, and pavement design.

Chenault Farms

Owner : Duncannon LLC

This property is located at the intersection of I-75 with Duncannon Lane at Exit 83 in Richmond, KY. The property comprises of two separate parcels of property, a 153 acre site located in the North-East Quadrant and a 63 acre located in the South-West quadrant. A mixed use development is proposed for the site.


One of the key elements is the access to the development from Duncannon Road. During the phase I design, it was vital to have an overall layout that is functional as well as appealing to the community. A layout was created for the site with the various uses, namely; commercial, single family housing, and multi-residential units. Integrated Engineering performed the design on the site at the direction of the owner.

A Regional Detention Basin was needed for the site, this was not only be cost effective but its functionality would be more effective compared to the design and construction of several smaller basins. Under the existing conditions, a sanitary sewer does not exist for the site. Based on Richmond Utilities Master Sewer Plan, a trunk sewer was proposed for the area. Integrated Engineering designed a Trunk Sewer System from the site to an existing sewer facility. This line was approximately 7000LF, and traversed a creek embankment. A Hec-Ras model was established to delineate the 100year flood plain and situate the sewer system above this elevation. Other site design aspects included the streets, storm and sanitary sewer, water distribution system, striping plans, erosion control & SWPPP plans.

Scott County Elementary School

Integrated Engineering is currently coordinating the site design and development of a 20 acre elementary school campus for Scott County Schools. The site is being designed to accommodate a 110,000 square foot elementary school and campus that includes 6 tennis courts, 1 baseball field, 1 softball field, and other recreational facilities. Other challenging site project elements include the following:

  • Coordination of the design of a 12’ tall x 600’ long retaining wall.
  • Design of a 2,000 LF Access Road from the Georgetown Bypass (US 460).
  • Design of the widening of Georgetown Bypass (US 460) to accommodate turning lanes into the school’s campus.
  • Design of a large rain garden as a green initiative and educational element.
  • Design of a safe and efficient traffic loop to accommodate peak AM and PM student drop off and pick up times.
  • Balancing the earthwork quantities on the existing subject property which has a 26 elevation difference.
  • Design of a regional detention basin to include the school campus and adjacent Amerson Farms Development for water quantity and quality measures.
  • Coordination with the planning and design of the surrounding 93 acre Amerson Farms Development. (Also being completed by Integrated Engineering)
  • Coordination of a 2,400 LF sanitary sewer extension to serve the school.

Construction is anticipated to begin start in the Spring of 2012.

Townley Apartments

Owner : Anderson Communities

This was an 11 acre development of apartments for Anderson Communities. The site is bound by LFUCG R/W, LFUCG Property, Detention Basin and Old Towne Walk. The existing site was covered with grass and construction debris and there is an existing storm and sanitary sewer located within close proximity to the site. The area along New Circle road has overhead utility and underground gas as well. There was a 28ft elevation difference from the North to South of the site.

The proposed site included 9 apartment buildings with a total of 216 units, a club house, parking for the site, and additional covered parking building for the tenants. A detention basin was not required for the site, since the runoff would be draining to a regional basin. Balancing the earth volume on the site was a critical element while, ensuring the site was ADA compliant. A walking trail encompassing the site is proposed, which will connect this community to proposed park and mixed use development.

Harrodsburg Road Intersection, Lexington, Kentucky

Integrated Engineering is currently assisting Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government on the redesign of the intersection of Harrodsburg Road with Waller Avenue & Mason Headley. This intersection does not meet the ADA & PROWAG guidelines for pedestrian access. Design includes relocating utilities, construction of sidewalks & ramps, relocation of existing infrastructure, striping plans and signal design for pedestrians. Integrated Engineering is responsible for the overall design and production of the construction plans for the project.

I-65/KY 222 Interchange

Owner : Kentucky Transportation Cabinet

Integrated Engineering is part of a design team with Palmer Engineering and QK4, on the design of the interchange at KY222 with I-65. The existing conditions of the interchange are such that congestion of traffic is worsening with continued growth of the adjacent area. This congestion is compounded by the proximity of large truck stop facilities in three of the four interchange quadrants. A secondary need for this project is to ensure that there will be sufficient capacity and desirable ingress and egress for the Glendale Development Site, a 1,500-acre tract of land that is zoned as I-2 (heavy industry). Potential development of this site could employ up to 2,500 people, resulting in 4,620 new vehicle trips per day along KY 222 west of I-65.

The preferred action is to realign and widen KY 222 such that it crosses over I-65 approximately 600 feet south of the existing KY 222. The preferred interchange is a single point configuration with two-lane entrance and exit ramps such that one signal controls the ramp and KY 222 traffic. Dual left turn lanes will be provided from KY 222 onto the entrance ramps. Control of Access will be obtained 2,200 feet west of the single point and 1,230 feet east of the single point.

Integrated Engineering is responsible for drainage analyses for approximately two miles of KY-222, including development of pipe sections and culvert drainage situation folders, drainage analysis for entrance pipes, design of roadside ditches, preparation of the erosion control plan, and assembly of drainage folders.

Townley Trail

Owner : Anderson Communities

This shared use trail was designed by Integrated Engineering for Anderson Communities. It is located off New Town Pike at the Townley Center. This is a mixed use community comprising of residential and commercial use. This trail was designed to connect the area neighborhood with the proposed park and mixed use development. This trail will eventually be connected with the Town Branch Trail and will form a part of a larger trail system.

The trail wraps around the exterior of the apartments and encompasses the existing detention basin. The trail was designed to accommodate the existing utilities without re-locating any utilities; these included electric, telephone, storm and sanitary sewer systems. Part of the trail was built on top of the dam of the existing detention basin. Segments of the terrain were steeper than desirable; four plank fences were utilized as a safety measure to mitigate the steep slopes for the pedestrians and the cyclists.


The shared use trail was designed to conform to the AASHTO design guidelines for mixed use trail. The proposed cross section for the trail included 8ft wide pavement with 2ft shoulders on both sides of the path. A 3ft clear zone from the edge of the shoulder was maintained. The design speed for shared use path was 15mph, and the horizontal and vertical curves were designed to meet the design speed criteria. Integrated Engineering worked closely with LFUCG to ensure the trail would be compatible with trail systems planned through out Kentucky.


MUTCD Signage Inventory & Evaluation, City of Hurstbourne, Kentucky

Integrated Engineering is currently serving as consultant for the City of Hurstbourne to provide assistance with mapping and identification of signage throughout the city. The evaluation includes recommendations for meeting the new requirements of the 2009 Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) for updated signage, and for meeting the new retroreflectivity guidelines.

Signage throughout the city has not been updated for many years, and includes signs that do not meet current regulations including size/dimensions, color, locations, height, distance from roadway, no blacked out backside, and include graffiti, stickers, and can sometimes be blocked by trees and bushes. Integrated Engineering is helping to evaluate these conditions, along with missing signage, and options for signing speed humps, and speed limits within the city.

The City is currently evaluating their long term process for replacement of signage, and meeting the new requirements for retroreflectivity.

Waterson Trail Multiuse Path

Chris Crumpton, PE is currently the project manager for the City of Jeffersontown Watterson Trail Multiuse Path Project. Mr. Crumpton along with Steve Garland managed the initial survey, coordination, and design effort for this CMAQ funded project. These services were provided while employed by another consultant. However, Integrated Engineering is currently serving as a sub-consultant for the design, LPA coordination, and construction administration for this design and construction project.

The scope of this project includes the design for a 1.5 mile multiuse path to connect multiple neighborhoods and other parts of the existing trail system to the downtown city center currently under revitalization, along Watterson Trail (a local and state road). Services include evaluating alternative alignments and making recommendations for drainage improvements. Construction drawings are being completed that include (2) major stream crossings with pedestrian bridges, the extension of existing culverts and replacement of headwalls, connections to neighborhoods, modifying drainage patterns along Watterson Trail, identifying major road crossing locations, providing ADA approved ramps, and identifying “share-the-road” areas. This design project will be provided for public review prior to submittal for the LPA process with KYTC.

Cincinnati/Northern KY International Airport (CNKIA)

CNKIA is one of only a handful of airports that can offer three simultaneous landings in the world. Integrated Engineering has provided topographic surveys for the resurfacing of Runway 9-27, which is approximately 7,500 feet in length and includes portions of Taxiway K & M. Integrated has also provided topographic surveys of the Employee Bus Maintenance Facility, provided services directly for CNKIA, and also teamed with URS Corporation for additional surveying and design services.

Cincinnati/Northern KY International Airport DHL Topo Survey

Integrated Engineering provided the topographic survey for the new expansion project at DHL at the CNKIA. The project included survey of the south end of the existing DHL facility in preparation of approximately 20 acres of paving additions, and roadway renovations. The survey limits included approximately 90 acres of topo of surface features and utilities.

Additionally, our firm provided interim survey data for earthwork stockpiles and verification of grades in fill areas for quantities.

The project is currently under construction.

Crossroads Community Church: Florence, Boone County, KY

This planning and surveying effort was lead by one of our Project Managers in the early 1990’s while at another firm. Located in Florence, KY, this tract was originally developed as a Builder’s Square Home Improvement Warehouse Facility and was subsequently utilized as a Pottery and Crafts Store until 2010. Our Client, Crossroads Community Church (based out of Cincinnati, OH) had recently selected this site to be renovated into a community church facility. In the Spring of 2011, Integrated-Riegler Engineering completed an ALTA / ACSM Land Title Survey for an 11.668 Acre Parcel of Land. This effort was initially started under the 2005 Minimum Standard then was updated to the new 2011 ALTA Standards. As typical with this size of development, we utilized GPS Survey Equipment for the Topo which included a detailed locations of pavements, utilities, buildings, parking, etc. We worked very closely with the Title Company to review and update their Title Commitment and to revise the final Schedule B Section II language, legal descriptions and Surveyor’s Certifications. The final ALTA drawing was presented in two-pages to help improve clarity. Boundary and easement information was highlighted on the first page, while topo, contours and utilities were emphasized on the second page. The Client was very satisfied as we met their schedule deadlines.

Brookstone Crossing Phase 2: Cold Spring, Campbell County, KY.

This planning and surveying effort was lead by one of our Project Managers in the 2004-2006 time frame while at another firm. The Brookstone Crossing is a Multifamily Apartment Home development located in Cold Spring, Campbell County, Ky. The developer was based out of Indianapolis, IN, and Phase 1 Construction was completed in 2006. The Client was ready to commence with Phase 2 in 2011, and an updated ALTA /ACSM Land Title Survey was required for financing. Part of our survey effort was to ‘As-built’ items constructed in Phase 1, as well as to document grades and items constructed within the limits of Phase 2. This updated topo also served as the background for the Phase 2 proposed improvements. The final ALTA drawing was presented in two-pages to help improve clarity. Boundary and easement information was highlighted on the first page, while topo, contours and utilities were emphasized on the second page.

Buttermilk Towne Center: Crescent Springs, Kenton County, KY

This development planning and survey effort was lead by one of our Project Managers several years ago. The Developer on this project was a Cincinnati-based development company who has since went through Bankruptcy on several of their developments throughout NKY and Southern Ohio. Our Project Manager was the Surveyor of record for the original survey effort, including subdivision platting, etc. Our new Client, based out of Northeastern Ohio, is purchasing the property through the bankruptcy court settlement and required an ALTA / ACSM Land Title Survey for their closing. This is being completed in November 2011, and includes approximately 46 acres of big-box retail, and some outlots that are presently vacant land. The ALTA included building and pavements locations and utility mapping, as well as parking counts, etc. The ALTA Drawing is being presented in a three-page format for clarity and scale. This 46-acre effort was completed in two-weeks to meet the Client’s aggressive and critical schedule for closing on the acquisition of the property.

Statewide Structures & Geotechnical Review for Traffic Operations

Statewide Traffic Operations Structure and Geotechnical Review Services - KYTC - Statewide, KY Integrated Engineering provides structural and geotechnical engineering review services to the Traffic Operations Department. Tasks include: the reviewing of shop drawings and calculations from manufacturers for compliance to all applicable codes, standards and specifications; maintaining of the state owned web application Signal and Lighting Standards Analysis (SALSA); and managing all construction and geotechnical problems associated with traffic and lighting poles.

Town Branch Trail Bridge, Lexington, KY

This project consists of the design of a 413’-6” pedestrian bridge for the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government on Phase 4 & 5 of the Town Branch Trail. This phase requires a bridge to cross a railroad and Town Branch Creek before bearing in a closed landfill. The substructure units founded in the landfill were required to be self supporting and therefore no load could be added to the cap or disturbed by excavation. The pier includes an observation deck with scenic views of the downtown skyline.